Past News and Events

As a Native person, our connections to these and other sites is reflected in a common saying I have heard all my life that ‘We walk on the bones of our ancestors’ to solemnize our connections to the ones who came before us, as well as to demonstrate our intimate connection to the land.”

-Director Dr. John Low (Pokagon Band of Potawatomi), Newark Earthworks Center.

Dr. John N. Low, Department of Comparative Studies | The Ohio State University.

Our Storytellers Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi

  

Three baskets made of splints from the Black Ash tree. Some strips are colored a deep brown and a soft black.

formerly in the Bricker Hall Lobby

190 North Oval Mall | Columbus, OH 43210

Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to "read the present.

This exhibit was curated by Director of the Newark Earthworks Center John N. Low, PhD, associate professor in Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University and enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.

Sponsored by The Newark Earthworks Center with support from an Indigenous Arts and Humanities Grant by the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

World Heritage Commemoration Open House

October 15, 2023 The site was open dawn to dusk. There is no registration or reservations needed for tours.

During the Newark Earthworks Open House, visitors are invited to explore and experience fully all three segments of these ancient, expansive earthworks built masterfully by American Indians. 
 

The Newark Earthworks served social, ceremonial and astronomical functions for their builders, people of the Hopewell Culture. The site is a National Historic Landmark and Ohio’s official prehistoric monument.

9 a.m. - Noon Remnants Walking Tour

Join one of our expert historians and storytellers, Jeff Gill, for a journey through the Newark earthworks! He will take you on a tour of the remnants of this once four-square mile complex of earthen walls and geometric enclosures that, in the words of Squier and Davis (1848), "can now be traced only at intervals, among gardens and outhouses." Enjoy an autumn walk and learn about the history of how the Newark Earthworks have been preserved for the last 2,000 years!

9 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. A Stationary History of the Newark Earthworks

Maybe you don't feel up to a 3-hour walking tour-that's okay! A Newark Earthworks interpreter will pick up where Jeff Gill left off. Join us at the Great Circle Museum to learn about the many stories the Newark Earthworks have to tell and how they have been stewarded by locals of the area for thousands of years!

10:00 a.m. - 1-:45 a.m. Filling in the Details: Archaeology of Hopewell Earthworks and Sites in Ohio

Join us as we gather a panel of archaeologists to chat about how we know what we know about the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks and the people that created and gathered in these spaces 2,000 years ago, and what we hope to learn in the future.

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Newark Earthworks Tours: The Octagon and Great Circle

Join a tour at either one of our sites for an immersive experience of these earthwork complexes! Please note these tours are in different locations and that this is a special day of the year when the Octagon is fully accessible. The Great Circle is open and accessible year-round. You will have the chance to join another tour of the sites at 2 p.m.!

  • Great Circle – 455 Hebron Rd., Heath, OH
  • Octagon Earthworks–125 N. 33rd St., Newark, OH

1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. Commemorating the Journey to World Heritage

The pathway to achieving World Heritage status for eight Hopewell Ceremonial Earthwork sites in Ohio has been years in the making! Join us for a chance to acknowledge the hard work and passion of many people that made this a possibility and what this means for the history and preservation of these sites in the future.

2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Newark Earthworks Tours: The Octagon and the Great Circle

Join a tour at either one of our sites for an immersive experience of these earthwork complexes! Please note these tours are in different locations and that this is a special day of the year when the Octagon is fully accessible. The Great Circle is open and accessible year-round. Dr. Low is leading a tour at the Octagon State Memorial.

  • Great Circle – 455 Hebron Rd., Heath, OH
  • Octagon Earthworks–125 N. 33rd St., Newark, OH

3:30 - 4:30 p.m. What World Heritage Means and How You Can Play a Role

You might be wondering, "What's the big deal with World Heritage? Why should this matter for us Ohioans and local community members?" Join our panel of experts to learn how achieving World Heritage will be meaningful to us all and how you can be a part of preserving these sacred spaces.

    For more information, visit the Ohio History Connection [external link].

    World Heritage Commemoration Open House Flyer PDF.

    Notice: Submission of U.S. Nomination to the World Heritage List

    The Department of the Interior has submitted a nomination to the World Heritage List for the “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks,” consisting of eight properties in Ohio, five of which are in Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in Ross County: Hopeton Earthworks, Mound City, High Bank Works, Hopewell Mound Group and Seip Earthworks; and three that are National Historic Landmarks: Fort Ancient in Licking County, owned by the State of Ohio, and the Octagon Earthworks and Great Circle Earthworks in Warren County, owned by the state-chartered Ohio History Connection.

    The nomination was submitted through the U.S. Department of State to the World Heritage Centre of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration by the World Heritage Committee, which will likely occur at the Committee's 46th annual session in mid-2023.

    This property has been selected from the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List, which comprises properties that appear to qualify for World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List, as required by the World Heritage Committee's Operational Guidelines.

    The “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks” are nominated under World Heritage cultural criteria (i) and (iii), as provided in 36 CFR 73.9(b)(1), as a group, or “series,” that collectively appears to justify criterion (i) by demonstrating a masterpiece of human creative genius: A 2,000-year-old series of precise squares, circles, and octagons and a hilltop sculpted to enclose a vast plaza. They were built on an enormous scale and the geometric forms are consistently deployed across great distances and encode alignments with both the sun's cycles and the far more complex patterns of the moon. The series also justifies criterion (iii) in providing testimony to its builders, people now referred to as the Hopewell Culture: Dispersed, non‐hierarchical groups whose way of life was transitioning from foraging to farming. The earthworks were the center of a continent‐wide sphere of influence and interaction and have yielded exceptionally finely crafted ritual objects fashioned from raw materials obtained from distant places. The properties, both individually and as a group, also meet the World Heritage requirements for integrity and authenticity.

    The World Heritage List is an international list of cultural and natural properties nominated by the signatories to the World Heritage Convention (1972). The World Heritage Committee, composed of representatives of 21 nations elected as the governing body of the World Heritage Convention, makes the final decisions on which nominations to accept on the World Heritage List at its annual meeting each summer. Although the United States is not a member of UNESCO, it continues to participate in the World Heritage Convention, which is an independent treaty. There are 1,154 World Heritage sites in 167 of the 194 signatory countries. The United States has 24 sites inscribed on the World Heritage List.

    Neither inclusion in the Tentative List nor inscription as a World Heritage Site imposes legal restrictions on owners or neighbors of sites, nor do they give the United Nations any management authority or ownership rights in U.S. World Heritage Sites, which continue to be subject only to U.S. federal and local laws, as applicable.

    Document Citation : 87 FR 16492. Document Number: 2022-06121. March 23, 2022.

    For the full notice's text, visit the National Archives [external link].

    How Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe | Barbara A. Hanawalt Public Lecture

    April 14 | 7 - 8:30 p.m. Free and Open to the Public.

      

    Flyer for the How Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe lecture on April 14, 2023, 7-8:30 p.m. Flyer text is to the left and below.

    Faculty Club Grand Lounge

    181 Oval Dr. S.

    Columbus, OH 43210

    The 2023 Annual Barbara A. Hanawalt Public Lecture will feature Caroline Dodds Pennock, Senior Lecturer in International History at the University of Sheffield.  

    History has long told the tale of Christopher Columbus’s ‘discovery’ of the Americas in 1492, but what is often forgotten is that Indigenous Americans ‘discovered’ Europe at almost the same moment. Tens of thousands of Native people crossed the Atlantic from as early as 1493, but their experiences are largely absent from popular understandings of the past.

    For tens of thousands of Aztecs, Maya, Totonacs, Inuit and others, Europe comprised savage shores, a land of riches and marvels, yet perplexing for its brutal disparities of wealth and quality of life, and its baffling beliefs. The story of these Indigenous Americans abroad is a story of abduction, loss, cultural appropriation, and, as they saw it, of apocalypse—a story that has largely been absent from our collective imagination of the times.

    From the Brazilian ‘king’ who met Henry VIII, to the Aztecs who mocked up human sacrifice at the court of Charles V; from the Inuk baby who was put on show in a London pub to the many enslaved people laboring in Spanish homes and workplaces: here are people who were rendered exotic, demeaned and marginalized, but whose worldviews and cultures had a profound impact on European civilization. Join Dr Caroline Dodds Pennock to hear the remarkable stories of some of the earliest Indigenous voyagers and learn how their experiences can transform popular perceptions of the past.

    Dr. Caroline Dodds Pennock is the author of On Savage Shores: How Indigenous Americans Discovered Europe (2023). She is probably best known as the only British Aztec historian. Her first book, Bonds of Blood: Gender, Lifecycle and Sacrifice in Aztec Culture (2008, PB: 2011) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Prize for 2008.

    As well as pestering people on twitter @carolinepennock, Caroline also works as a popular history writer, consultant, and 'talking head' expert for TV and radio, having appeared on programs for broadcasters including the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, the Smithsonian Channel and Netflix.

    This event is free and open to the public. Co-hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, The Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the American Indian Studies Program and the Humanities Institute.


    Parking: The nearest public parking available is at the Ohio Union North and and Ohio Union South Garages (North is available to visitors after 4 p.m.). For more information, follow the links to CampusParc. 

    The Humanities Institute and its related centers host a wide range of events, from intense discussions of works in progress to cutting-edge presentations from world-known scholars, artists, and activists, and everything in between. In our current moment of riding the unpredictable currents of the pandemic, we reaffirm the value of in-person engagement. We strive to amplify the energy in the room. But we also recognize the need to be careful and the fact that not all our guests will be able to visit our space. We, therefore, will continue to offer Zoom access to all our events upon request. If you wish to have such access, please send your request to cmrs@osu.edu or moriarty.8@osu.edu.

    Octagon Open Houses

    April 16th and April 17th, 2023 The site will be open daylight to dusk, with staff on site to answer questions from Noon–4 p.m. There is no registration or reservations needed for tours.

    During the Newark Earthworks Open House, visitors are invited to explore and experience fully all three segments of these ancient, expansive earthworks built masterfully by American Indians. 
     

    On April 16th Newark Earthworks Center Director Dr. John Low will be giving a tour at 2:30 p.m. at the Octagon State Memorial, and at the Great Circle at 4 p.m.

    The Newark Earthworks served social, ceremonial and astronomical functions for their builders, people of the Hopewell Culture. The site is a National Historic Landmark and Ohio’s official prehistoric monument.

    Activities will be held at the Great Circle and Octagon. See below for times.

    Information Tables • Noon–4 p.m.
    Whether you’re waiting for or resting from your Octagon Earthworks guided tour, there is still a lot to learn about. Visit one of the information tables hosted by the Ohio History Connection and others.

    Guided Octagon Earthworks Tour • 12:30, 2:00 & 3:00 p.m.

    Join Ohio History Connection archaeologists and World Heritage staff Brad Lepper or Jennifer Aultman as they walk with guests through the circle and octagon earthen walls that make up the impressive Octagon Earthworks. Stops along the way will point out specific features including Observatory Mound and the many openings in the earthworks that are key to the 18.6-year lunar alignment encoded into the landscape.

    Participating sites

    • Great Circle – 455 Hebron Rd., Heath, OH
    • Octagon Earthworks–125 N. 33rd St., Newark, OH
    • Wright Earthworks – North of Grant St. on James, parallel to State Route 79 in Newark

      For more information, visit the Ohio History Connection.

      Mounds, Moon and Stars: The Legacy of Ohio's Magnificent Earthworks Art Exhibit

      January 21, 2 p.m.-4 p.m. | On Display through April 1, 2023 Free and open to the public.
      Welcome to the Mounds, Moon and Stars: The Legacy of Ohio's Magnificent Earthworks Art Exhibit. The Works, Newark Ohio. Mica hand above grey plinth with welcome in Ohio's indigenous languages.
      Welcome to the Mounds, Moon and Stars:
      The Legacy of Ohio's Magnificent Earthworks Art Exhibit. The Works, Newark, Ohio.

       

      The visionary people of the Hopewell culture’s presence remain with us today, and we are still discovering the depth of their engineering expertise, artistic brilliance, and influential spiritual worldview. Join us in recognizing and appreciating the People who designed and developed the ceremonial sites we now call the Newark Earthworks.

      The Works

      55 S. 1st Street,

      Newark, Ohio 43055

       740-349-9277

      Hours  9 a.m.- 4 p.m.   Tuesday - Saturday

      Developed in a collaborative partnership between The Great Circle Alliance and The Works, with support from the Newark Earthworks Center, The Ohio State University at Newark.

      Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants

      March 27 | 5 p.m. John and Mary Alford Performing Arts Hall 1209 University Drive, Newark, Ohio Free and Open to the Public. Registration Required.

        

      Flyer for Robin Wall Kimmerer March 27, 2023. Text to the left and below.

      Free books available for the first 100 registrants!

      Book signing to follow.

      Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment. Kimmerer will discuss her experiences as an Indigenous scientist and writer and explore how we can deepen our understanding of the natural world through Indigenous ways of knowing. She will share stories and insights that challenge us to rethink our relationship with the Earth and all its inhabitants, and inspire us to cultivate a more respectful, reciprocal, and sustainable relationship with the world around us.

      Additional Book Access:

      Free copies of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants are still available at the library front desk on the Newark campus of The Ohio State University and Central Ohio Technical College.  Our address is 1219 University Dr. ; please pick up your copy by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 27

      Electronic copies of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants are available: https://library.ohio-state.edu/record=b10174856~S7

      Additional print copies can be requested through OhioLINKLicking County Library, and Columbus Metropolitan Library.

      Sponsored by the Newark Earthworks CenterOffice of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Office of Multicultural AffairsJohn L. and Christine Warner LibraryNewark Campus BookstoreCentral Ohio Technical College and The Ohio State University at Newark

      If you need accommodations for this event, please contact Stephanie Rowland at Rowland.245@osu.edu by March 13th. The university will make every effort to meet requests after this date.

      Faculty Talk Outside the Box: “Waiving Laws to Enforce Laws: The Case of U.S. Border Wall Construction.”

      March 1st, 2023 | 4 p.m. Free and open to the public. This event is hybrid, it will be held in person in the Reese Center, Room 225, and on Zoom. 

        

      Dr. Kenneth Madsen, Department of Geography | The Ohio State University

      We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Shannon Donley at donley.82@odu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

      Professor Kenneth Madsen from the Department of Geography will give a Faculty Talk Outside the Box on “Waiving Laws to Enforce Laws: The Case of U.S. Border Wall Construction.” 

      To expedite the construction of barriers along the border with Mexico, U.S. Secretaries of Homeland Security have waived an extensive array of laws since 2005 when authority for such actions was first delegated to that position as part of the REAL ID Act.  This presentation contextualizes the political origins of what is referred to as Section 102(c) waiver authority, shows how these waivers are used to dramatically expand border barrier construction, and reviews legal challenges.  In doing so, it connects the use of waivers in governance as viewed through the study of law with the theoretical prominence of states of exception in the discipline of geography.  By examining the specific ways in which these legal practices and their geographic expression have institutionalized a state of exception that pushes the boundary of legal acceptability, we arrive at a more transdisciplinary understanding of the role of states of exception as a tool of governance. 

      During Faculty Talks Outside the Box, Ohio State Newark professors discuss recent research in their fields as it relates to our community and answer questions. 

      The Ohio State University at Newark offers an academic environment that is inclusive of diversity, challenging but supportive with world-renowned professors and access to Ohio State’s more than 200 majors. It’s where learning comes to life. Research, study abroad and service learning opportunities prepare students for their careers in ways they never expected.

      For more information visit newark.osu.edu 1179 University Drive Newark Ohio 43055

      Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit Webinar with Dr. Jean O'Brien

      February 23, 2023 | 7 p.m. EST Free and open to the public.

        

      Dr. Jean O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe Nation) in front of a a bookcase filled with books. University of Minnesota.

      The Newark Earthworks Center is hosting Dr. Jean M. O’Brien (White Earth Ojibwe Nation), University of Minnesota, who will present on "Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit." on Zoom at 7 p.m. EST.

      This talk takes up the work of Indigenous intellectuals to reconfigure narratives of national origins in connection with the symbolism surrounding the Massasoit monument installed on Cole’s Hill in Plymouth in 1921 to mark the 300thanniversary of the landing of the English. Such Indigenous engagements suggest the rich potential of Indigenous public historians to intervene in sanitized national narratives of origins. Can the statue prompt viewers to reckon with of the structural violence of settler colonialism in commemorative landscapes, or does it further entrench celebratory narratives of national origins?

      7:00 – 8:00 p.m. EST
      Carmen Zoom, Registration Required.

      We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Dr. John Low at 740-755-7857 or low.89@osu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

      There will be 15 minutes for a Question and Answer session at the end of the webinar. Please submit your questions in the chat.

      Jean M. O’Brien (Citizen of the White Earth Ojibwe Nation) is Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Northrop Professor at the University of Minnesota. She is a co-founder past president of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, O’Brien has published six books on Indigenous history. Most recently, she published a co-edited volume(with Daniel Heath Justice), Allotment Stories: Narrating Indigenous Land Relations under Settler Siege, (University of Minnesota Press). She is an elected member of the Society of American Historians and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

      Speaker series as part of Indigenous Ohio: OSU and Native Arts and Humanities Past and Present grant. Funded by the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

      Kind thanks to Jared Gardner Department of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies for assisting in set up and hosting this web presentation.

      Muskrat versus Canary: The Future of Federal Indian Law Webinar with Dr. Matthew Fletcher

      November 10, 2022 7 p.m. EST Free and open to the public.

        

      Dr. Matthew Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians), University of Michigan.

      The Newark Earthworks Center is hosting Dr. Matthew Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians), University of Michigan, who will present "Muskrat versus Canary: The Future of Federal Indian Law" on Zoom at 7 p.m. EST.

       Federal Indian law and policy is marked by dramatic confrontations between paradigms described metaphorically, such as George Washington's "Savage as the Wolf" policy or Felix Cohen's "Miner's Canary" parable. These metaphors reflect that reality that federal Indian law and policy was imposed on tribal nations, usually without their consent or consultation. Even today, five decades after the beginning of the tribal self-determination era, the Miner's Canary parable remains the most-used shorthand metaphorical shorthand to describe Indigenous affairs in the United States But in my view, those metaphors are no longer useful to describe tribal nations. Tribal nations now possess agency and, occasionally, significant political and economic power. Congress and the Executive branch have largely embraced and enabled tribal self-determination. The United States Supreme Court has not. Or has it? Tribal nations have fared better in the Supreme Court since 2014 than in any other period of American history. Even so, the Court is paradigmatically split. In my scholarship, I have adopted the Anishinaabe creation story about the lowly, but heroic, Muskrat as my metaphor to describe modern tribal nations. The Supreme Court is poised to either accept and enable the new paradigm of tribal self-determination or eradicate it in favor of keeping tribal nations weak and passive. It is a paradigmatic battle of the Muskrat versus the Canary.

      7:00 – 8:00 p.m. EST
      Carmen Zoom, Registration Required.

      We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Dr. John Low at 740-755-7857 or low.89@osu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

      There will be 15 minutes for a Question and Answer session at the end of the webinar. Please submit your questions in the chat.

      Matthew L.M. Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band citizen), is the Harry Burns Hutchins Collegiate Professor of Law at Michigan Law. He teaches and writes in the areas of federal Indian law, American Indian tribal law, Anishinaabe legal and political philosophy, constitutional law, federal courts, and legal ethics, and he sits as the Chief Justice of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians.

      Professor Fletcher also sits as an appellate judge for the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, the Colorado River Indian Tribes, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, the Hoopa Valley Tribe, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, the Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians, the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi Indians, the Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians, the Santee Sioux Tribe of Nebraska, and the Tulalip Tribes

      Speaker series as part of Indigenous Ohio: OSU and Native Arts and Humanities Past and Present grant.  Sponsored by the Newark Earthworks Center and the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme

      Kind thanks to Jared Gardner Department of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies for assisting in set up and hosting this web presentation.

      Visiting Artist Residency Presentation & Conversation with Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga)

      November 16, 2022 12:30 - 1:30 EST Hopkins Hall 358, Columbus 2 - 3 p.m. EST Barnett Center Collaboratory, 141 Sullivant Hall, Columbus Free and open to the public.

        

      Flyer for Frank Buffalo Hyde's talk at Hopkins Hall and the Barnett Center. Text from the flyer is replicated to the left. Image courtesy of the artist.

      The Ancient Indigenous Monuments and Modern Indigenous Arts Project presents: Visiting Artist Residency Presentation and Conversation with Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga) for an artist presentation about how his work challenges Native American stereotypes through tapping into the collective unconsciousness of the 21st Century. Drawing images from advertisement, movies, television, music and politics, Buffalo Hyde's expresses observation, as well as knowledge through experience, developing overlapping imagery to mimic the way the mind holds information in a non-linear way. 

      The presentation will be followed by a conversation with Buffalo Hyde as part of Our Unlearning Hour: Mask Dialogues.

      Funded by the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme and presented in collaboration with the Newark Earthworks Center and the Department of Art.

      #LandBack: Histories of Restoring Indigenous Presence Webinar

      November 17, 2022 | 7 p.m. EST Free and open to the public.

        

      Dr. Doug Kiel, Northwestern University. Image courtesy of Dr. Kiel.

      The Newark Earthworks Center is hosting Dr. Doug Kiel, Northwestern University, who will present "#LandBack: Histories of Restoring Indigenous Presence" on Zoom at 7 p.m. EST.

      Land is at the heart of Indigenous identities, and histories of U.S. colonialism are largely defined by attempts to separate Native people from their collective inheritance. Native communities have reacquired territory through a variety of means in recent years, which has often been met with resentful opposition at the local level. The Land Back movement is nonetheless gaining steam, accruing victories and making a better world. This present-day movement has roots that reach deep into the past, and has high stakes for the future.

      7:00 – 8:00 p.m. EST

      Carmen Zoom, Registration required.

      We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable all individuals, including individuals with disabilities, to engage fully. To request an accommodation or for inquiries about accessibility, please contact Dr. John Low at 740-755-7857 or low.89@osu.edu . At least two weeks' advance notice will help us to provide seamless access.

      There will be 15 minutes for a Question and Answer session at the end of the webinar. Please submit your questions in the chat.

      Dr. Doug Kiel (PhD., University of Wisconsin–Madison, 2012) is a citizen of the Oneida Nation and studies Native American history, with particular interests in the Great Lakes region and twentieth century Indigenous nation rebuilding. He is working on a book manuscript entitled Unsettling Territory: Oneida Indian Resurgence and Anti-Sovereignty Backlash. The Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, a community that had been dispossessed of their New York homelands in the early nineteenth century, yet again suffered devastating land losses as a result of the Dawes Act of 1887—a policy that President Theodore Roosevelt once called “a mighty pulverizing engine to break up the tribal mass.” Kiel’s book examines how the Oneida Nation’s leaders strengthened the community’s capacity to shape their own future by envisioning, deliberating and enacting a dramatic reversal of fortune during the twentieth century. His book also examines the origins of recent litigation between the Oneida Nation and the Village of Hobart, a mostly non-Native municipality that is located within the boundaries of the Oneida Reservation and seeks to block the tribe from recovering land that was lost a century ago. 

      Speaker series as part of Indigenous Ohio: OSU and Native Arts and Humanities Past and Present grant.  Sponsored by the Newark Earthworks Center and the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme

      Kind thanks to Jared Gardner Department of English and Director of Popular Culture Studies for assisting in set up and hosting this web presentation.

      2022 Octagon State Memorial Open Houses

      April 10 and 11, 2022, July 25, October 16, 2022 The site will be open daylight to dusk.

        

      Map of the Octagon State Memorial with numbered points of interest. 1. Viewing platform, 2. Observatory mound, 3. Observatory circle, 4. River terraces, 5. Openings into the Octagon, 6. Small circular earthwork, 7. Great Hopewell Road earthworks. Image courtesy of The Ancient Ohio Trail.

      At 2 p.m. Director of the Newark Earthworks Center Dr. John Low will be giving a guided tour

      Contact the Ohio History Connection [external link] for more information.

      The Octagon State Memorial [external link] is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site!

      Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public.

      Food Sovereignty Workshop

      October 13-14, 2022 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST Locations: OSU Thompson Library (Day 1) and the STEAM Factory (Day 2)

        

      Pile of ripe corn. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      If you are interested in the cultural contexts of local food systems and exploring cross-cultural, community-partnered fieldwork, this workshop is for you! The workshop will take place over the course of two days and will be an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding, form partnerships, and begin taking action right away. We will explore how the assets local communities bring to these projects can transform research. Speakers will share examples of what working towards food sovereignty can look like in diverse local/global contexts, including the U.S. and Yemen. We will look at a variety of practices and contexts for cross-cultural interdisciplinary partnerships. 

      You can check out the program here. 

      Globally, 27% of people faced moderate or severe food insecurity in 2019, representing more than 2 billion people. Community-Centered Approaches for Food Systems Transformation will be framed around the question: “How we might reprioritize research and teaching based on community partnership rather than "expertise?” In other words, how might learning from communities take precedence over learning about them. The workshop will focus on the cultural contexts of local food systems and will look at cases in the U.S., the Middle East, and other regions.


      We will examine a variety of practices, including historic food production, projects in urban areas, and others. Food security is especially urgent for indigenous communities worldwide, many of whom continue to bear the burdens of displacement from their native lands. For example, 1 in 4 Native Americans in the U.S. is food insecure (Stanger-McLaughlin et al., 2021).

      The purpose of the workshop is to shed light on research and grassroots projects that address this urgent crisis, highlighting the work currently being done by communities around the world to produce nutrition-dense, culturally relevant cuisine. Headlining the workshop is Dr. Brandy Phipps, Research Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition and Health – Agriculture Research Development Program, Central State University who will serve as the keynote speaker, focusing on the SUSHI food sovereignty project she is leading in partnership with the Menominee Tribal College of Wisconsin. Dr. Phipps is an inspiring model of leadership. Learn more about her work in this short video.

      Dr. Phipps' keynote will be followed by a conversation between experienced researchers doing work in community food systems in the U.S., Belize, and Yemen, and moderated by an expert in community food security. They will shed light on research and grassroots projects that address this urgent crisis, highlighting the work currently being done by communities around the world to produce nutrient-dense, culturally relevant cuisine.

      Speakers bios:

      Brandy Phipps
      Research Assistant Professor of Food, Nutrition and Health – Agriculture Research Development Program, Central State University
      Dr. Phipps is an Assistant Professor with a research focus on a) the intersection of climate change, nutrition/health equity, and food systems transformation; and b) holistic interactions of biomolecules in plant extracts and foods and the mechanisms of biomolecules in the prevention/alleviation of disease. Dr. Phipps is Project Director on a $10 M USDA-funded project and Co-Pi on $1.5 M in additional USDA- and FDA-funded projects. She has 20+ years of higher education teaching experience in the Biological and Life Sciences, and currently teaches Anatomy and Physiology, Nutrition and Undergraduate Research classes. She is particularly passionate about providing educational equity, advanced experiential STEM learning opportunities, and personalized mentoring to PEER students and those who have been socially and economically disadvantaged. Dr. Phipps is an inspiring model of leadership. Her current work includes leading a transdisciplinary team focused on food systems transformation which includes significant work to support food sovereignty efforts of the Menominee Nation. Learn more about her work in this short video.

      Brian Kowalkowski
      Dean, Department of Continuing Education
      College of Menominee Nation
      Brian Kowalkowski started at College of Menominee Nation in 2007 as Assistant Director of Education Outreach Extension. Prior to that he worked for the Menominee Tribal Government for nine years, first as a land use planner and then as a community resource planner. His current position as Dean of Continuing Education requires him to manage and administer all grants and contracts of the department and act as the Extension Director. He analyzes community data to determine appropriate activities to be undertaken by the department. He also works with different community agencies to establish cooperative working relationships. A major accomplishment has been the creation of a local farmers market on the Menominee Reservation that has coincided with the improvement of access to fresh foods. He is involved with numerous local, state and federal professional organizations, representing his college and 1994 Tribal Land Grant schools.

      Daniel Varisco
      President, American Institute for Yemeni Studies
      Anthropologist, Historian
      Dr. Daniel M. Varisco will discuss what local food systems can look like in the context of Yemen. Dr. Varisco is an anthropologist with field research and extensive experience in Yemen regarding traditional agricultural systems and their intersection with policy and politics. He is also a historian and Arabist who has edited and translated mediaeval Rasulid agricultural texts and other Arab scholarship. He is experienced as a consultant to the World Bank (conservation and food security) and USAID. He will draw on his experience with community involvement in development projects and the successes of grassroots efforts. Besides Yemen, he has conducted research in Egypt, Qatar and the UAE. https://ias.academia.edu/DanielVarisco

      Kareem M. Usher, PhD.
      Assistant Professor
      College of Engineering / Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture City and Regional Planning Section
      Dr. Kareem M. Usher is an Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Knowlton School of Architecture. His academic identity can be described as a public scholar who strives to create a peaceful, just and loving world by reducing human suffering through community-engaged planning research - the co-production of knowledge between community members and faculty, with the site of inquiry being food systems at the neighborhood scale. Dr. Usher’s research focuses on urban food systems and he engages this topic at the intersection of food access, social justice, regional governance and community economic development. Methodologically, his work incorporates compassion as a planning approach and ‘action research’ or community-engaged scholarship. By working with communities on food systems in real places and in real-time, he has developed a body of empirical work that provides the foundation for an emergent research program at the intersections of community development, theory and praxis. His work has spanned geographies: rural-suburban-urban, Global South-Global North, Mid-western-Southern United States; cultures and socio-economic groups: African American, Appalachian, Non-Hispanic European, and Indigenous Peoples: Belizean ethnic groups – Kriol, Garifuna and Maya (Q’echi). Acknowledging that there remains much to know and understand in order to address ‘wicked’ social problems and effect sustainable change, Dr. Usher employs compassionate community engagement to uncover and lift up new ways of knowing – new epistemologies co-created with citizens who are the experts in their communities.

      Moderator:

      Mary Rodriguez
      Associate Professor
      Department of Agricultural Communication, Education and Leadership

      The workshop will take place over the course of two days and will be an opportunity for participants to deepen their understanding, form partnerships, and begin taking action right away. The conversations from day 1 will continue on day 2, which is geared towards turning all of this information and discussion into new activities by facilitating new collaborations. Some outcomes we might achieve by 3:00 on Friday include: new course development, teams formed around aspects of current programs, new grant/funded project proposal teams formed, institutional pathways for more equitable research, and whatever the assets and creativity each person brings to the table can achieve. To continue the discussion after the workshop, we are partnering with Columbus’ Growing and Growth Collective on a film series focused on food sovereignty projects locally and around the world.

      Scientists, economists, historians, public health experts, etc., are welcome! We will consider how food systems, eco-systems, cultures and economies are mutually sustaining. Speakers from communities in the U.S., the Middle East, and other parts of the world will share their work in food sovereignty and what it means, both in its local context and implications for the rest of the world. Topics for discussion will follow this framework: Achieving nutrient density and health outcomes through food sovereignty projects while addressing historic inequities.
      Sustaining culturally relevant food sovereignty through effective collaboration, ethical knowledge sharing and education.
      What makes successful cross-cultural partnerships and the best results in terms of knowledge, prosperity and health outcomes.

      The speakers will discuss what food sovereignty means to their cultural heritage and the role cross-cultural partnerships may play. We will therefore be looking at examples of both cross-cultural community building and transdisciplinary collaboration. We will follow up the workshop with action steps such as grant writing, educational activities and support for food sovereignty work locally and in other parts of the world. 

      A Multi-unit Collaboration!

      This food sovereignty workshop is brought to you by a partnership between University Libraries, the Global Water Institute, and the Middle East Studies Center. Our partnership with the Growing and Growth Collective supports this workshop and the film series on Food Sovereignty we will be co-hosting. 

      Many thanks to our co-sponsors without whom this event would not have been possible. They include:

      Our Storytellers Bodéwadmi Wisgat Gokpenagen The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Exhibit Opening

      October 10, 2022 4 p.m. EST Free and Open to the Public. Celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day with us!!!

        

      Three baskets made of splints from the Black Ash tree. Some strips are colored a deep brown and a soft black.

      Bricker Hall Lobby

      190 North Oval Mall | Columbus, OH 43210

      Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to "read the present.

      This exhibit is curated by Director of the Newark Earthworks Center John N. Low, PhD, associate professor in Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University and enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.

      Sponsored by The Newark Earthworks Center with support from an Indigenous Arts and Humanities Grant by the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

      Pokagon Potawatomi baskets presented to Ohio State

      September 12, 2022 | Chris Booker, Ohio State News Art celebrates university’s expansion of educational opportunities for Native students, staff and faculty

        

      Over 200 Ohio fifth graders and teachers visited the Great Circle Earthworks and Dr. John N. Low provided them with traditional stories and songs and spoke to them about the Newark Earthworks.  The morning was warm, sunny, blue sky against fall foliage and the children asked many questions of Dr. Low.

      Former Ohio State University President Kristina M. Johnson recently joined Ohio State Newark Dean William MacDonald for the presentation of a hand-crafted black ash basket made by noted Pokagon Potawatomi artist Jenny (Brown) Chapman.

      John Low, associate professor in comparative studies at the Newark campus, shared the artwork with the university to celebrate Ohio State’s role in expanding educational opportunities for Native students, staff and faculty. Low teaches history, American Indian studies and religious studies. He is also an enrolled member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians.

      “Native cultures played a significant role in the history of this country, yet their existence has been threatened by systemic and long-standing prejudices, mistreatment and environmental degradation. The preservation of traditions like the weaving of black ash baskets, which came so close to being lost forever, is critical to maintaining the proud heritage of the Pokagon Potawatomi people,” Johnson said after receiving the gifts. “I was honored to recently receive a basket and felt the weight of its importance dating back generations. We must do everything we can to ensure the Pokagon can continue to engage in this beautiful and sacred craft.”

      The black ash baskets are an important part of Pokagon Potawatomi culture. Low said while the baskets are considered artwork and are often displayed in museums, they are meant to be handled and used.

      “The baskets are alive. They have a spirit. They like to be touched. They don’t want to feel cotton gloves. They want human beings,” Low said. “They’re art, of course, but they also have a function. They carry things. They also carry ideas and hopes.”

      Over the past century, the practice of basket weaving has been threatened – first by the enforcement of government regulations that contributed to loss of land and resources, and now by the ecological threat presented by the emerald ash borer beetle.

      In the 1970s, skilled artisans founded the Pokagon Basket Makers’ Co-op to revive and carry on the art of basketry, which continues to thrive today.

      “Women created the co-op and revived the whole renaissance of the basket making process and the art form. It really revived the spirit and the heart of the community,” Low said. “By 1994, we had our federal sovereignty, our federal recognition restored to us, so it’s a really wonderful story. It means a lot to me, too, because my grandmother was a basket maker.”

      The Potawatomi continue to work for the survival of the black ash tree, treating trees on tribal lands with organic pesticides and collecting seeds that may be replanted in the future. 

      Low’s collection of black ash baskets is currently on display at the Field Museum in Chicago until October. “Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets: Our Storytellers” allows patrons to listen to the stories of the baskets as well as the Pokagon people’s story of tradition and resilience.

      At former President Johnson's suggestion, details are being completed to exhibit the baskets again on the Columbus campus after the close of the exhibit in Chicago.

      Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Baskets: Our Storytellers

      April 16, 2021- September 2022.

      Opens to the public in the Maran Gallery near the Maori House.

      "This exhibition celebrates these baskets and their makers. It tells a story of survival and resilience. But it also contains a cautionary tale and a warning of environmental catastrophe as the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle from Asia, decimates black ash populations in North America. What will the Pokagon Potawatomi make their iconic baskets out of if all the black ash trees are gone? That is a question that concerns us all." -Dr. John N. Low, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Co-Curator and Basket Caretaker.

      The Field Museum

      1400 S Lake Shore Drive,

      Chicago, IL 60605

      Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood Art of Gerry Lang

      Spring 2022-Summer 2022 This event is free and open to the public.

        

      Multimedia mixed collage of stages of the moon and planets surrounding an American Indian wearing stellar regalia. Image courtesy of Gerry Lang, the artist.

      Lang is a multi-medium artist who traces the tangled journey paths between self, community and identity and the ways we can be embraced, rejected, celebrated or dismissed based upon perception and perspective. His award winning art presents a thought provoking panorama of the artist’s own processes of challenge, discovery and resistance to labels of assumption and consumption as a mixed-blood messenger.

      LeFevre Art Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
      LeFevre Hall
      1199 University Drive, Newark campus

      Quantum memory by Gerry Lang. Ceramic bowl with stripes of color. Image courtesy of Gerry Lang.

      This exhibit can be viewed during regular gallery hours throughout the spring semester.

      Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood Art of Gerry Lang Exhibit PowerPoint, 2022. (PDF)

      Sponsored by The Ohio State University's Newark Earthworks Center and made possible by a grant from the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme at The Ohio State University.

      Artist Gerry Lang (Chowanoke Nation) at the LeFevre Art Gallery describing his Return from Exile exhibition
      Artist Gerry Lang (Chowanoke Nation) at the LeFevre Art Gallery describing his exhibition.

      Dr. John Low Elected Board Member of the Chicago History Museum!

      We are pleased to share that Dr. John Low has been elected to the Chicago History Museum (CHM) Board of Trustees for a four-year term. Dr. Low is the first American Indian to have been invited to serve on the Board since its founding in 1856. Dr. Low says he will make sure that he won't be the last. Congratulations, Dr. John Low!


      Founded in 1856 and incorporated as a nonprofit organization under the laws of the state of Illinois in 1857, the Chicago Historical Society (CHS) is the city’s oldest cultural institution and home to millions of historical objects, images and documents. Nationally recognized for its holdings, CHS is devoted to collecting, interpreting and presenting the rich multicultural history of Chicago, as well as selected areas of American history. In 2006, following an extensive building renovation and rebranding initiative, CHS created a new public identity for itself as the Chicago History Museum (CHM), which operates as the building and institutional public presence under the auspices and legal oversight of CHS.

      Wombed Hollows, Sacred Trees: Burial Mounds and Processual Indigenous Subjectivity and Earthworks Tour

      April 14, 2022 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Presentation by Dr. Chadwick Allen,  Professor of English This talk is free and open to the public.
      Dr. Chadwick Allen, University of Washington

      All events sponsored by the CSR are free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored with the American Indian Studies Program in the Center for Ethnic Studies.

      Since the eighteenth century, settler cultures have represented North American burial mounds as ancient “mysteries” and historical “enigmas”—sites of Indigenous vanishing that provide settlers with opportunities for creating scientific discovery, economic profit, and cautionary tales of angry ghosts from “lost” civilizations. But there are other narratives to tell about these sophisticated earthworks, other conceptual frames for understanding not only their functions as technologies for interment but also their ongoing power as symbols for Indigenous presence. Drawing from his new book Earthworks Rising: Mound Building in Native Literature and Arts [external link], Chadwick Allen analyzes works by contemporary Native writers and artists that demonstrate Indigenous conceptions of interment within mounded earth. These provocative “earth”-works unsettle dominant narratives by reactivating Indigenous understandings of burial mounds as active sites of renewal and regeneration.

      For more information and registration, visit go.osu.edu/allen

      And don't miss the Newark Earthworks Tour!

      Great Circle with dramatic tree shadows. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.

      Saturday, April 16, 10AM | Newark Campus

      The Center for the Study of Religion is thrilled to be sponsoring a curated tour of the Great Circle, part of the Newark Earthworks with guest scholar Chadwick Allen and Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, John Low. 

      The tour will begin at 10am with lunch to follow at the Newark campus. 

       

      Take your tour with you with The Ancient Ohio Trail!

      This event is hosted by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Indian Studies.

      Octagon State Memorial Open House

      April 10, 2022 Celebrate the first Octagon Open House of the year with us and enjoy a gallery talk with artist Gerry Lang at the LeFevre Art Gallery with the "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood art of Gerry Lang"!
      Octagon State Memorial on a sunny day.

      The Octagon State Memorial [external link] is one of the most spectacular surviving remnants of the Newark Earthworks [external link]. The Octagon is connected to a perfectly circular enclosure 1,054 feet in diameter. The architecture of the Octagon Earthworks encodes a sophisticated understanding of geometry and astronomy. It is a National Historical Landmark and is on track to become a World Heritage site! Portions of the Octagon Earthworks is open to the public during daylight hours 365 days a year, but much of the site is used as a private golf course for most of the year, so access is restricted. Four times each year, however, golfing is suspended and the entire site is made available to the general public. The site will be open daylight to dusk. 

      Please revisit the Ohio History Connection [external link] for more information.

      Octagon State Memorial

      125 N. 33rd Street

      Newark, OH 43055

      April 10, 2022 Octagon Open House Flyer, pdf linked. Text also below.
      [PDF available]. 

      At 2 p.m. Director of the Newark Earthworks Center Dr. John Low will be giving a guided tour of the Octagon State Memorial Earthworks.

      And at 4 p.m. Artist Gerry Lang is giving a Gallery Talk: "Return from Exile: the Mixed-Blood Art of Gerry Lang" at the LeFevre Art Gallery at Ohio State Newark!

      Gerry Lang standing in front of a blue toned art piece. Image provided by the artist.

      Gerry Lang is a multi-medium artist who traces the tangled journey paths between self, community and identity and the ways we can be embraced, rejected, celebrated or dismissed based upon perception and perspective. His award winning art presents a thought provoking panorama of the artist’s own processes of challenge, discovery and resistance to labels of assumption and consumption as a mixed-blood messenger.

      LeFevre Art Gallery
      1199 University Drive
      Newark, OH 43055

      Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 
      8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

      This exhibit can be viewed during regular gallery hours throughout the spring semester. 

      Sponsored by The Ohio State University's Newark Earthworks Center and made possible by a grant from the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme at The Ohio State University.

      Unsettling Archaeology and History in an American Heartland: Recollecting and Reconnecting the Past in the Miami Valley of Southwest Ohio

      March 29, 2022 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Virtual Faculty Talks Outside the Box Talk | Dr. Robert Cook,  Professor of Anthropology This talk is free and open to the public.
      Professor Dr. Robert Cook of Anthropology, The Ohio State University. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      The study of the past is rapidly changing. Archaeologists, historians and scholars from related disciplines have come to recognize that their work is deeply rooted in the same set of settler/colonial narratives and assumptions that have shaped Western society more broadly. In this "Faculty Talk Outside the Box," Dr. Robert Cook will discuss his work to “decolonize” archaeological and historical research practices. His presentation will focus on his involvement in an interdisciplinary study of a particular site in southwestern Ohio--Turpin--and its goal of helping mend severed attachments to ancestral homelands. Yet this project goes further and conducts a type of archaeology of archaeology itself, studying the process as it was first practiced in the late 1800s and remedying its deficiencies through modern field and lab methods in collaboration with descendant communities and other stakeholders. Ultimately, the goal of the project is to develop a model for a decolonized archaeological research centered on collaboration between archaeologists, historians descendant communities and the broader public.

      Roundtable One | On Indigenous Studies

      March 11th, 2022
      Michael Charles (left) and Gregorio Gonzales (right).

       

      This series of roundtable webinars features presentations and moderated conversations that foster cross-disciplinary exchange. Each roundtable showcases two to three members of the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme's post-MFA and postdoctoral cohort whose work shares disciplinary, methodological and/or topical alignment.

      • Michael Charles | Postdoctoral Researcher, Newark Earthworks Center
      • Gregorio Gonzales | Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Comparative Studies
      • Moderator: Melissa Curley | Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Studies
      • Moderator: John Low | Director of Newark Earthworks Center

      About GAHDT’s post-MFA and postdoctoral program

      This program supports post-MFA and postdoctoral researchers and creative practitioners and provides professional development opportunities with the goal of facilitating their entry into tenure-track positions in the academic marketplace and the public arts and humanities. The valuable presence of these researchers and practitioners adds intellectual energy and vitality to the College of Arts and Sciences as a whole, contributing to interdisciplinary collaboration between academic units and the development of innovative scholarship and curricula.

      For more information, visit the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme.

      Earthworks: Land Art in the West with John N. Low, James Nisbet, Leigh A. Arnold, James Baker

      January 5, 2022 | 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Ticket required, discount for members and Museum Friends.

      The Petrie Institute of Western American Art's 16th annual symposium will consider historical contexts of earthworks—both ancient and contemporary—as well as individual artists and their contributions to land art.

      To mark the 50th anniversary of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Valley Curtain, a dramatic installation in the Colorado landscape, the Petrie Institute’s 16th annual symposium will explore the history of land art in the West. Making interventions in the landscape and often using earth itself as a medium, artists in the late 1960s and 1970s reimagined artmaking and subverted art world norms.

      Tickets to this symposium will also include breakfast, lunch, access to the museum, and a happy hour.

      Newark Earthworks Center

      Opening September 9, 2021.
      Simulated moonrise over the Newark Earthworks' observatory mound as it would have been 200 B.C. - 400 A.D. Image Courtesy of the Ancient Ohio Trail and CERHAS of the University of Cincinnati.
      The Ohio State University at Newark
      1179 University Drive
      Newark, Ohio 54055

      The Newark Earthworks Center exists today as a center on the Newark campus of The Ohio State University. Opened in 2006, it is the only academic research center on an Ohio State University regional campus.

      The Center’s primary focus is to promote research, support faculty, contribute to student experiences, support appreciation of the ancestral sites and peoples and contribute to a campus and university environment of diversity, equity and inclusion.

      The Center’s value and relevancy is centered on respect, recognition, preservation, celebration and promotion of Indigenous peoples and their achievements, past, present and future.

      The current exhibit "Welcome to the Newark Earthworks Center" highlights the activities and accomplishments of the center together with an imagining of the creation of a distinct physical space for the Center on the Newark Campus.

      Newark Earthworks Center Exhibit PowerPoint, 2021. (PDF)

      The Black Ash Baskets of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians

      Autumn 2019
      Gallery opening at the LeFevre Art Gallery of the Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash Basket Exhibit. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      Potawatomi basket making is a reclamation and recovery of a powerful piece of native knowledge and technology and represents a potent counter-colonial and counter-hegemonic act with lasting implications. This exhibit reflects an understanding that objects are not lifeless things that occupy space. They have spirit and meaning. Centered upon intellectual and material property, basket weaving is an opportunity for Native women and men to make their own histories by using the past to ‘read’ the present.

      LeFevre Art Gallery

      The Ohio State University Newark

      Newark, Ohio 43055


      The exhibit is curated by John N. Low, PhD, associate professor in Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University and enrolled citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians. He received his PhD in American Culture from the University of Michigan. His most recent book Imprints: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians & the City of Chicago was published by the Michigan State University Press (2016).

      Sponsored by grants from the Global Arts and Humanities/ Indigenous Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Program in American Indian Studies, the Milliken Fund at The Ohio State University Newark, and the Newark Earthworks Center.

      Up Close with U.S. - Mexico Border Barriers

      Autumn 2018 A Photo Exhibit by Dr. Kenneth Madsen
      View of the Mexican-United States border wall with a cloudy sky. Image courtesy of Dr. Madsen.

      For some the existence of the U.S.–Mexico border fences and walls only recently gained their attention, but Kenneth Madsen, associate professor of geography at The Ohio State University at Newark has had an eye on them for over 20 years. His research has resulted in an extensive collection of photographs and maps.

      The exhibit photographs showcase the varying types of barriers along the border and places them in geographic context for communities unable to see the fences and walls in person. Maps accompanying the exhibit are the result of Madsen’s realization of the need for a comprehensive look at the laws being waived for border barrier construction.

      “I have been learning about U.S.-Mexico border fences and walls since I undertook a class project on the topic in spring 1998 for a course I was taking on the Arizona-Sonora border at Arizona State University. From there the topic bloomed and it ended up being the focus for my master’s thesis in 1999,” he said.

      Madsen has been tapped by news outlets ranging from CNBC to the Los Angeles Times for his expertise on the U.S.-Mexico border barriers and the laws being waived for their construction.
      He received his PhD. in geography from Arizona State University in 2005. He has been teaching at Ohio State Newark since 2008.

      LeFevre Art Gallery

      The Ohio State University Newark

      Newark, Ohio 43055

      The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia

      November 2017 - May 2018
      The Art of Ngatu celebration of the artists with tapa cloth behind them. Image courtesy of the artists.

      The exhibition “The Art of Ngatu: Tradition, Innovation and Community in Polynesia” combines original artwork, traditional tapa (beaten bark cloth), photography, film and ephemera. Exhibition content focuses on artists Dame Robin White (New Zealand) and Ruha Fifita (Tonga), their process and practice in Polynesia. Collaborating with communities of indigenous women, the artists use traditional methods to produce tapa while also incorporating innovation and contemporary narratives related to the history of Polynesian communities.

      About the artists:

      Dame Robin White (born Te Puke, New Zealand, 1946) is one of New Zealand’s greatest visual artists. Of Pakeha and Maori descent, White was one of the most prominent painters of the 1970’s, producing numerous iconic New Zealand images. She subsequently lived on the island of Tarawa in the Republic of Kiribati for 17 years before returning to New Zealand in 1999. She has continued working since then with groups of indigenous women, weavers and artists, from around the Pacific.

      In 2003 White was made a Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit. Robin White says her tapa-based works are about “those things that connect different peoples.” Collaborating with indigenous people, using traditional processes, materials and techniques, her tapa work infuses ordinary subjects with values that are timeless and like an ocean, borderless.

      Ruha Fifita is an internationally-respected artist from Tonga. Her ngatu work was recently exhibited at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. Ruha advocates for increasing youth voices and a continued link to indigenous culture, which she believes is one of the region’s greatest strengths. She is currently Curator of Polynesian Art at Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia.

      The exhibition was co-curated by Dr. John N. Low and Marcus Boroughs, former director of the Aratoi Wairarapa Museum of Art and History in New Zealand.

      Financial support provided by the Milliken Fund This event was sponsored by: The Newark Earthworks Center, The American Indian Studies Program at The Ohio State University, The Office of Student Life at The Ohio State University at Newark, The Black Box Theater and the Ohio State Newark/Central Ohio Technical College Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council.

      LeFevre Art Gallery

      The Ohio State University Newark

      Newark, Ohio 43055

      Ancient Ohio Trail Landscape Exhibit

      Reference and Special Collections Librarian John Crissinger holding up a raised map of the Newark Earthworks that is part of the Ohio Native Heritage Archives. Image courtesy of Timothy E. Black.

      Reference and Special Collections Librarian John Crissinger holding up a raised map of the Newark Earthworks.

      Close-up of Ohio earthworks and lidar images in the Ancient Ohio Experience Exhibit. Image Courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      Traveling exhibit of Ohio earthworks produced in conjunction with The Ancient Ohio Trail.

      The Ancient Ohio Trail Logo

       

       

       

       

       

      My Dream Show

      Autumn 2014 Candi Wesaw, American Indian artist, illustrator and educator
      Reception for artist Candi Wesaw at LeFevre Art Gallery in Newark, Ohio, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014. (Photo by Timothy E. Black)

      Artist Candi Wesaw with (l-r) Dick Shiels, Newark Earthworks Center, Burt Logan, Executive Director and CEO of the Ohio History Connection, Dr. William MacDonald, dean/director of Ohio State Newark, Marti Chaatsmith, Newark Earthworks Center, and John Low, JD, PhD., Assistant Professor of Comparative Studies at Ohio State Newark.

      Candi Wesaw is from Hartford, MI and a citizen of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation. Wesaw is deeply connected to her culture, heritage and the arts. She works in multiple mediums and formats, including illustration, textiles, photography and traditional native arts. Drawings depict tribal rituals of the past, while photographs show how her tribe continues these traditions in modern day Michigan and Indiana.

      Visitors walking the gallery show of Candi Wesaw's My Dream Show at LeFevre Art Gallery. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      “Her artwork really captures the unique essence of the Potawatomi tribe, and it’s an honor to have that on display here,” said John N. Low, JD, PhD. Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State Newark.

      Examples of her work can be found, here [external link].

      Sunday, October 12, 2014 Artist's Reception

       

      Aerial view of the Candi Wesaw exhibit in the LeFevre Art Gallery during the opening. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      More than 75 works focusing on the rich culture of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Indians by Potawatomi artist, illustrator and educator Candi Wesaw were recently featured in the LeFevre Hall Art Gallery. Eighteen elders of the Pokagon Band travelled to Newark from southwest Michigan and northwest Indiana to attend the Gallery Opening. Wesaw and other citizens of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation also attended an Open House earlier in the day at the Newark Octagon Earthworks as guests of the Newark Earthworks Center (NEC), an official center of the university.

      “The Shwatso Shkote Collection, or “Prophecy of the Eight Fires,” was an especially moving collection; showing where the Potawatomi have come from and the possibility that we all may be fated to disappear if we choose to over-rely on technology to solve our human problems,” stated Josh Robison, student participant. He added: “The entire day was very educational and moving; it helped me to better understand the struggles that Native peoples have gone through in this country.” Robison is a senior at Ohio State Newark double majoring in Psychology and History. 

      This event was graciously sponsored by: the Newark Earthworks Center, The Ohio State University Newark, the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indian Nation, the American Indian Studies Program at The Ohio State University, the Ohio History Connection and the Cultural Arts and Events Committee.
      For more information, contact John Low, JD, PhD., Department of Comparative Studies at low.89@osu.edu.

      Thompson Library Exhibit

      Dr. Richard Shiels standing between two glass exhibition cases of earthworks images and books in the Thompson Library. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.

      Former Director Dr. Richard Shiels at the Thompson Library at The Ohio State University in front of the exhibit.

      Close-up of the Newark Earthworks Exhibit at the Thompson Library. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University
      Close-up of the Newark Earthworks Exhibit at the Thompson Library. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University
      Close-up of the Newark Earthworks Exhibit at the Thompson Library. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University

      LiDAR Exhibit

      LiDAR image of the Newark Earthworks' Octagon. Image Courtesy of the Newark Earthworks Center, The Ohio State University.

      LiDAR image of the Newark Earthworks Octagon State Memorial, image from the exhibit.

      Colorful Pokagon Potawatomi Black Ash baskets, one with a handle, and another with a lid. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University.
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      Close-up of the Newark Earthworks Exhibit at the Thompson Library. Image courtesy of The Ohio State University
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